2019 Arteon Technical Specifications, Models & Other Info






Here’s your crash course on the new Volkswagen flagship sedan.
1. Design is the Name of the Game
The Arteon name is taken from the Latin word for art (artem) and alludes to the emphasis VW placed on its design. The VW team set out to “open a new chapter” in the evolution of four-door coupes with features such as chrome strips on the frameless side windows and a wraparound grille.
2. Room to Stretch
The nearly 112-inch wheelbase helps provide drivers and passengers with far more space than most fastback-style vehicles. While most fastback cars can feel cramped in the backseat, especially for taller passengers, the Arteon has space for rear-seat passengers to lean back, cross their legs, and relax.
3. Worth the Wait
Three-and-a-half years passed between initial discussions about the Arteon and final production. It is scheduled to arrive in America this spring.
4. A Car That Packs a Bite
In creating the low, coupe-like silhouette of the Arteon, the Volkswagen design team drew inspiration from nature. In particular, designers looked to imitate the streamlined and athletic profile of predators, including sharks.
5. A Different Light
Volkswagen introduced a unique lighting architecture with the Arteon: The grille and headlights weave together into a seamless unit, a feature that wowed the engineering team when designers first presented it.
6. Form, Meet Function
The 27-cubic-foot trunk provides cargo space that exceeds that of most sedans, making the Arteon practical in a way that many similar types of vehicles are not. For example, folding down the rear seat provides a total of 55 cubic feet of cargo space.
7. Choose Your Ride? You Can Do That
The standard DCC adaptive chassis control feature of the Arteon allows drivers to configure the vehicle’s running gear for “normal,” “comfort,” or “sport” driving. The comfort mode helps even out bumpy rides, while the sport mode helps stiffen damping to create a more direct connection between the driver and the road.
8. Driver Assistance, Of Course
The Arteon offers a host of Driver Assistance features, including standard Forward Collision Warning and Autonomous Emergency Braking, standard Blind Spot Monitor with Rear Traffic Alert, and standard Automatic Post-Collision Braking. Available features include Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Assist, Light Assist, Park Assist, and Park Distance Control.
9. Make It Bolder
Ready for the all-new four-door coupe? Now you can make it your own with the R-Line® package. It’s new from VW and gives you a sportier interior and some enviable, dynamic exterior treatments. It will be available when the Arteon goes on sale this spring.
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Even as it hits the United States, the Volkswagen Arteon already has won awards for its unique style. A blend of four-door sedan, hatchback and sport-car cues, the Arteon looks like no other vehicle on the road, and its role as the flagship of Volkswagen in America suggests where the brand’s future designs will evolve.
There may be no more challenging job in the automotive world than designing a vehicle. It’s not just taking a blueprint of a chassis from engineers and making it look pretty. It requires blending art, customer tastes and societal cues – and anticipating how the final result will resonate years into the future. Bold yet timeless design has been one of Volkswagen’s strengths for decades and, as the Arteon shows, will remain one for years to come.
Yet even car experts struggle sometimes to say what exactly it is that makes one car attractive and another … not so much. Here’s a short glossary of automotive design terms that can help you pinpoint what’s turns your head on the road:
A-Line: If you traced a vehicle’s silhouette from front to rear, you’d have the A-line, or main profile. This line often defines the entire character of a car, and a few millimeters here and there can mean the difference between sleek or dull.
Beltline: The horizontal line that divides the sheetmetal from the glass in a vehicle. Just as a higher or lower beltline on a human body drastically alters a person’s look, the height of a vehicle’s beltline can make it look sporty and menacing or welcoming and airy. In the Arteon, the beltline is balanced for a classical feel.
Character Line: The creases running horizontally along the side of the vehicle that give it a visual definition. “We have a line,” says Klaus Bischoff, Volkswagen Head of Design, “that runs through the entire car and brings the volume of the Arteon even closer to the ground. This line starts in the radiator grille at the front and runs cleanly over the side profile and into the tail lights.” At the rear, it develops into a sharp undercut, which visually reduces the height of the Arteon and carries the strong shoulder section upwards.
C-Pillar: Car designers have a lettering system for the pillars that contain the passenger compartment when viewed from the side; the A-pillar frames the front, the B-pillar is where the door edges meet, and the C-pillar frames the rear side windows. Over time the C-pillars and the angle formed where the sheetmetal and glass meet have become brand touchstones for several automakers and key models — few more so than the Volkswagen Golf. In the Arteon, the C-pillar follows the long arch of the rear hatch, ending in a discreet angle with a premium touch of glass and chrome.
Down the Road Graphics: If you’ve ever tried to identify a car at night simply from the shape of its headlights, you’ve memorized what designers call “down the road graphics.” With the arrival of LED daytime running lights, there are more ways than ever to distinguish vehicles through light. The Arteon makes the most of this with its dramatic light signature of the daytime running light that angles into the grille, framing the LED headlights.
Fastback: The car body term dates back to before World War II, when automakers first began optimizing aerodynamics. Long roofs that slope down to a car’s trunk provide several aerodynamic benefits, and eventually such profiles were called fastbacks. The fastback shape of the Arteon gives it a dynamic and elegant look among midsize sedans.
Flitzer: The German term for the side badge on Volkswagens where the front door line meets the fender.
Greenhouse / Day Light Opening (DLO): The shape and total area of the glass around a passenger compartment in a vehicle. Owners generally favor open, airy greenhouses, but too much glass can make for awkward exterior design. Sports cars often have the smallest DLOs that emphasize performance at the expense of visibility. The best designs offer a balance between extremes, while panoramic sunroofs such as the one in the Arteon, add a further dimension.
Joint Line: Any place on a vehicle where two body panels meet. Joint lines are rarely the centerpiece of a vehicle’s design, but they can add or detract greatly from the overall impression. The joint line where the hood of the Arteon meets the front wheelarch shows how graceful such seams can be.
Overhang: As seen from the side, the part of the car that extends ahead and behind of the wheelarches. Classic American cars commonly had a foot or two of sheetmetal and frame sticking out in front and back. In the modern era, smaller overhangs have become the more preferred style (and provide more assured handling, as more of the vehicle’s weight lies within the wheelbase.)
Power Dome: A term for a hood bulge that gives the impression of power underneath. Once quite common, the industry has been moving toward flatter hoods (or even slightly hoods for electric vehicles.) In the Arteon, there’s only a hint of a power domeinstead, the “clamshell” hood creates its unusual look by stretching the entire width of the car, folding down at the edges to the wheelarch.
Rake: The angle of the windshield as seen from the side of the car. The Volkswagen Beetle was a good example of a vehicle with almost no windshield rake. Modern vehicles have more rake for lower wind noise and better aerodynamics, although glare can be an issue at too great an angle.
Shoulder: The side curve of a vehicle body, typically above the wheels. Many vehicles lack shoulders entirely, as the roof and sides meet in one continuous line. On the Arteon, its shoulders create one of its most distinctive features around the rear fender and hatch.
Track: The width between the wheels. Narrower cars have better aerodynamics, but wider vehicles look more premium. Much of the design of the Arteon emphasizes its width, from the flowing horizontal brightwork in the grille to the taillights and seamless, one-piece hatch.
Tumblehome: A nautical term that describes the inward angle of the greenhouse. Pickups, vans and many SUVs have zero to little tumblehome to optimize interior space (and because looking “blocky” can be a virtue.) Just the right amount of tumblehome can be the difference between an attractive design and a competent, but boring, one.
Wedge: The horizontal angle at which a car sits when viewed from the side. Minivans have zero wedge; drag racers have extreme wedge. The Arteon adds to its overall sport-inspired design with a slight wedge body that rises along its entire length.
Wheelarch Gap: The space between the wheel and the body. It’s a particular obsession for many auto fans, with a whole enthusiast community devoted to “slammed” cars that have no gap at all. Trucks and off-road SUVs require more gap, but even in those types of vehicles designers work to ensure the body still provides an aesthetically pleasing space. With the R-Line’s optional 20-inch wheels[1], the stance of the Arteon carries only a modest gap.
he all-new Volkswagen brand halo starts at $35,845, marrying the space of a midsize
sedan 
to the sleek design of a premium coupe

  • Front-wheel-drive models starts at $35,845 MSRP; 4Motion® AWD MSRP starts at $37,645
  • Arteon is based off the award-winning MQB architecture
  • 268 horsepower 2.0-liter TSI® engine is paired with a standard eight-speed automatic transmission
  • Standard features include: 18-inch aluminum-alloy wheels, full LED headlights, Front Assist, Side Assist, Rear Traffic Alert, and DCC® adaptive damping
  • Available premium features include: Volkswagen Digital Cockpit, ambient lighting, panoramic sunroof, massaging driver’s seat, and Dynaudio® premium audio
  • Available driver assistance technology  includes: ACC with Stop and Go, Lane Assist, Light AssistPark Assist, Park Distance Control, and Area View
  • R-Line® trims add sporty exterior and interior design treatments
  • America’s Best Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty, with 6-years/72,000-miles (whichever occurs first) of transferable coverage

HERNDON, VA (March 28, 2019) — Volkswagen of America, Inc., today announced that pricing of the all-new 2019 Arteon will start at $35,845 MSRP for the SE FWD model and $37,645 for the SE 4Motion®. Built off the award-winning Volkswagen MQB architecture, the 2019 Arteon features a wide, planted stance, short overhangs and sleek coupe-like design.
The new Arteon will be powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged and direct-injection TSI® engine, making 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. The power is taken to the front wheels via a standard eight-speed automatic transmission; 4Motion all-wheel drive is available on every trim level. Arteon features a standard DCC® adaptive damping system, which manages the suspension’s rebound and compression rates individually, helping to improve vehicle dynamics, and a standard Start-Stop system designed to help improve fuel efficiency.
The technology in the 2019 Arteon also includes a combination of both passive and active safety systems that are engineered to meet or exceed current crash regulations. These systems include eight airbags, including knee airbags for front passengers, and the Automatic Post-Collision Braking System.
The Arteon also features a reactive hood. Using sensors to identify a collision with a pedestrian, the system helps to mitigate injuries caused by contact with hard points under the hood by firing small pyrotechnic charges at the hinges to raise the hood in the rear by about two inches.
Every Arteon comes with the People First Warranty, America’s Best Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty. The warranty provides coverage for six-years or 72,000-miles (whichever occurs first), and can be transferred to a subsequent owner throughout the remainder of its duration.
The 2019 Volkswagen Arteon will be available in SE, SEL, and SEL Premium trim levels and is expected to arrive at U.S. Volkswagen dealers in April. The vehicle builder tool is now available on VW.com.

MODEL LINE UP
Arteon SE
The Arteon SE starts at $35,845 and features a standard four-cylinder turbocharged 2.0L TSI engine and front-wheel drive. Arteon SE with 4Motion all-wheel drive starts at $37,645. Standard exterior features include 18-inch aluminum-alloy wheels; standard LED headlights (with LED Daytime Running Lights) and taillights; chrome grille; frameless side windows with chrome window surrounds; and dual trapezoidal exhaust tips.
Inside, the 2019 Arteon sports standard leatherette seating surfaces; heated front seats; and 12-way power front seats including 4-way lumbar support. Other standard features include KESSY® keyless access with push-button start; three-zone Climatronic® automatic climate control; leather-wrapped multi-function steering wheel; rearview camera; rain-sensing wipers; auto-dimming rearview mirror; brushed metallic décor; and stainless-steel door sills and pedal caps.
Standard connectivity features include an 8.0-inch Composition Media touchscreen infotainment system with SiriusXM® Satellite Radio with three-month trial subscription; Bluetooth® connectivity for compatible devices; two USB ports; eight speakers; and Volkswagen Car-Net® App-Connect for compatible devices, enabling integration with the three major smartphone platforms—Apple CarPlay™, Android Auto™ and MirrorLink®. Standard driver assist features include Forward Collision Warning and Autonomous Emergency Braking (Front Assist), Side Assist, and Rear Traffic Alert.
Arteon SEL
Building off of the SE trim, the Arteon SEL starts at $39,995 for front-wheel-drive models and $41,795 for models with 4Motion. Standard features include LED headlights with the Adaptive Front-lighting System (AFS); a panoramic sunroof; power folding mirrors with memory; remote start; Nappa leather seating surfaces; driver seat memory; wood-look décor; ambient lighting; an 8-inch Discover Media infotainment system with navigation; 12.3-inch Volkswagen Digital Cockpit display, allowing drivers to reconfigure how they view vehicle information; and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with Stop and Go.
Arteon SEL Premium
The Arteon SEL Premium builds off the SEL trim and starts at $44,945. The SEL Premium features standard 4Motion all-wheel drive and rides on 19-inch aluminum-alloy wheels. Interior features include a heated steering wheel; paddle shifters; ventilated front seats; massaging driver’s seat; heated rear seats; brushed aluminum décor; tri-color ambient lighting; rear-seat controls for the Climatronic system; Volkswagen Car-Net connected vehicle services; and the 700-watt Dynaudio® premium audio system with 12 speakers.
The top-of-the-line trim also includes a power trunk with Easy Open and Close, which allows drivers to walk up to the vehicle with keys in a pocket or purse and simply kick a foot under the rear bumper to pop the trunklid—closing the trunk only requires a touch of the button. Standard driver assistance features include active Lane Keeping System (Lane Assist); High Beam Control (Light Assist); Parking Steering Assistant (Park Assist) including Park Distance Control; and Overhead View Camera (Area View).
R-Line® Trims
R-Line trims feature a suite of performance-inspired exterior and interior design treatments that amplify the bold appearance of the Arteon. Arteon SE, SEL, and SEL Premium R-Line trims available with 19-inch aluminum-alloy wheels add $1,265 to the base price of the model. Arteon SE, SEL, and SEL Premium R-Line trims with 20-inch aluminum-alloy wheels add $1,765 to the base price of the model.

DESTINATION
Destination fee on all models is $995.           


About Volkswagen of America, Inc.
Founded in 1955, Volkswagen of America, Inc., an operating unit of Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. (VWoA) is headquartered in Herndon, Virginia. It is a subsidiary of Volkswagen AG, headquartered in Wolfsburg, Germany. VWoA’s operations in the United States include research and development, parts and vehicle processing, parts distribution centers, sales, marketing and service offices, financial service centers, and its state -of-the- art manufacturing facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Volkswagen Group is one of the world's largest producers of passenger cars and Europe's largest automaker. VWoA sells the Atlas, Beetle, Beetle Convertible, e-Golf, Golf, Golf Alltrack, Golf GTI, Golf R, Golf SportWagen, Jetta, Passat, and Tiguan vehicles through more than 600 independent U.S. dealers. Visit Volkswagen of America online at www.vw.com or media.vw.com to learn more.
Notes: This press release and images of the 2019 Arteon will be available at media.vw.com


1
2019 Arteon
Technical Specifications
ENGINE
Type
Bore
3.25 in
82.5 mm
3.25 in
82.5 mm
Stroke
3.65 in
92.8 mm
3.65 in
92.8 mm
Displacement
121 cu in
1984 cc
121 cu in
1984 cc
Compression Ratio
Horsepower (SAE) @ rpm
Maximum torque, lb-ft @ rpm
Fuel Requirement
ENGINE DESIGN
Arrangement
Cylinder block
Crankshaft
Cylinder head
Valvetrain
DRIVETRAIN
Driven wheels
Transmission Gear Ratios:1
CAPACITIES
Fuel Tank
17.4 gal
66 L
17.4 gal
66 L
STEERING
Type
Turns (lock to lock)
2.8
2.8
Turning Circle (curb to curb)
39 ft
11.9 m
39 ft
11.9 m
Ratio
13.6:1
13.6:1
INTERIOR VOLUME - SAE
EPA Class
Seating Capacity
Passenger Volume
96.2 cu ft
96.2 cu ft
Cargo Volume
27.2 cu ft
27.2 cu ft
with rear seats folded
55 cu ft
55 cu ft
Front
Rear
Front
Rear
Volume
50.8 cu ft
45.7 cu ft
50.8 cu ft
45.7 cu ft
Headroom (in/mm)
37.7/958
37.0/940
37.7/958
37.0/940
Shoulder room (in/mm)
56.5/1435
54.7/1389
56.5/1435
54.7/1389
Legroom (in/mm)
41.2/1046
40.2/1020
41.2/1046
40.2/1020
BODY, CHASSIS AND SUSPENSION
Type
Body Material
Front Suspension
Rear Suspension
Brakes
Anti-Lock Braking System
Stability Control
Parking Brake
Wheels/Tires
Drag Coefficient
2.0L inline four cylinder, 16V, turbocharged and intercooled, TSI
Arteon 2.0T 4Motion
Arteon 2.0T FWD
9.3:1
268 @ 5500
9.3:1
268 @ 5500
2.0L inline four cylinder, 16V, turbocharged and intercooled, TSI
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Reverse
5.59
3.14
1.95
1.43
1.21
1.00
0.81
0.67
3.99
258 @ 1950
Premium unleaded recommended
258 @ 1950
Premium unleaded recommended
Forged Steel
Aluminum alloy
Double overhead camshaft, chain driven, four valves per cylinder, maintenance-free hydraulic lifters, variable intake and exhaust timing, variable exhaust-valve lift
Forged Steel
Aluminum alloy
Double overhead camshaft, chain driven, four valves per cylinder, maintenance-free hydraulic lifters, variable intake and exhaust timing, variable exhaust-valve lift
Front-wheel drive
Automatic
All-wheel drive
8th
Reverse
Automatic
Front mounted, transverse
Cast iron
Front mounted, transverse
Cast iron
Large Sedan
Five
Unitary construction
Rack and pinion: electric power assist
Rack and pinion: electric power assist
5.59
3.14
1.95
1.43
1.21
1.00
0.81
0.67
3.99
3.53
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
1st
2nd
3rd
Multilink with coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar
Power assisted, dual circuit, 13.4 x 1.2-in vented front discs and 12.2 x 0.9-in vented rear discs
Standard, all four wheels, four-channel with electronic brake pressure distribution
Standard Electronic Stability Control (ESC)
Electro-mechanical
Unitary construction
Steel stampings
Strut-type with lower control arms, coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar
Large Sedan
Five
245/45 R18 96H, all-season tires
19-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
245/40 R19 94H, all-season tires
20-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
245/35 R20 95H, all-season tires
0.30
0.30
18-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
245/45 R18 96H, all-season tires
19-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
245/40 R19 94H, all-season tires
20-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
245/35 R20 95H, all-season tires
Final
3.53
Final
Steel stampings
Strut-type with lower control arms, coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar
Multilink with coil springs, telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar
Power assisted, dual circuit, 13.4 x 1.2-in vented front discs and 12.2 x 0.9-in vented rear discs
Standard, all four wheels, four-channel with electronic brake pressure distribution
Standard Electronic Stability Control (ESC)
Electro-mechanical
18-in x 8J aluminum-alloy wheels
2
2019 Arteon
Technical Specifications
Arteon 2.0T 4Motion
Arteon 2.0T FWD
DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase (in/mm)
Front Track (in/mm)
Rear Track (in/mm)
Length (in/mm)
Width (in/mm)
Height (in/mm)
Ground Clearance (in/mm)
WEIGHTS
Curb Weight
3655 lb
1658 kg
3854 lb
1748 kg
GVWR
4740 lb
2150 kg
4938 lb
2240 kg
Payload
893 lb
405 kg
849 lb
385 kg
FUEL CONSUMPTION
City mpg
22
20
Highway mpg
31
27
Combined mpg
25
23
Specifications, equipment, options, and prices are subject to change without notice.
191.4/4862
73.7/1871
111.7/2837
62.5/1587
62.1/1577
191.4/4862
73.7/1871
56.5/1435
5.4/138
56.5/1435
5.4/138
111.7/2837
62.5/1587
62.1/1577

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